X Close Menu
  • Featured Posts
  • Show All Posts

"If the Epistle to the Romans rightly has been called 'the cathedral of Christian faith', then surely the eighth chapter may be regarded as its most sacred shrine, or its high altar of worship, of praise, and of prayer. . . . Here, we stand in the full liberty of the children of God, and enjoy a prospect of that glory of God which some day we are to share" (Charles Erdman).   The beauty of Romans 8 can be seen in two of its most prominent characteristics. (1) Ther...Read More

I.              Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17   A.            Paul and the Principles of the Gospel- 1:1-7   1.             The messenger of the gospel - 1:1   a.              his captivity - v. 1a b. ...Read More

How is a Christian to act with regard to matters not explicitly addressed in Scripture? How is a Christian to conduct himself/herself in situations on which the Bible is silent? This is the question Paul addresses in Romans 14. We could as easily ask: "What is the nature and extent of Christian freedom" The NT speaks of three types of freedom: 1) Freedom from the condemnation of God (cf. Rom. 8:1); 2) Freedom from the compulsion to sin (cf. Rom. 6:14); and 3) Freedom fro...Read More

IV.          God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 V.            God's Principles for Living - 12:1-15:13 A.            The Christian and Life - 12:1-21 B.            The Christian and Law - 13:1-14   1.        &nbs...Read More

IV.          God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 V.            God's Principles for Living - 12:1-15:13   a A.            The Christian and Life - 12:1-21   Here we see the spiritually organic relationship between Christian doctrine and Christian duty. From the lofty theological heights of Romans 1-11,...Read More

In terms of its place in the argument of the epistle, Rom. 1:18-3:20 is something of an interruption. Moo explains:   "Paul implicitly acknowledges that 1:18-3:20 is an interruption in his exposition of the righteousness of God by his clearly intentional 'reprise' of 1:17 in 3:21: 'But now the righteousness of God has been manifested. . . .' Why this interruption? What is the purpose of this step-by-step indictment of humanity?" (88)   It would appear that ...Read More

I.              God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 A.            Israel's Fall - 9:1-33   1.             Paul's pain - 9:1-5 2.             God's purpose - 9:6-13 3.         &nb...Read More

A.            Authorship Romans claims to have been written by the apostle Paul (1:1), a claim to which there has never been a serious challenge. Paul, however, did employ an amanuensis, named Tertius (Rom. 16:22), the ancient equivalent of a modern-day secretary, who actually put pen to parchment. There are three possible roles for an amanuensis: 1)           ...Read More

I.              Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17   A.            Paul and the Principles of the Gospel- 1:1-7   1.             The messenger of the gospel - 1:1   2.             The message of the gospel - 1:2-4 &...Read More

Addendum: Additional Comments on Homosexuality in Romans 1:18-32...Read More

I.              Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 A.            Paul and the Principles of the Gospel - 1:1-7 This introduction of himself to the Romans is unusually long by Pauline standards. According to Moo, "the length and theological orientation of this prescript are due mainly to the fact that Paul was introducing himself to a church that he had ...Read More

I.          Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 II.        The Way of Salvation - 1:18-5:21 A.        Human Depravity: the doctrine of universal sin - 1:18-3:20 1.         Sin & Condemnation of the Gentiles - 1:18-32 2.         Sin & Condemnation of the Jews - 2:1-3:8 T...Read More

I.              Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 II.            The Way of Salvation - 1:18-5:21   A.            Human Depravity: the doctrine of universal sin - 1:18-3:20   B.            Divine Deliverance: the doctrine of partic...Read More

I.          Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 II.        The Way of Salvation - 1:18-5:21 A.        Human Depravity: the doctrine of universal sin - 1:18-3:20 B.        Divine Deliverance: the doctrine of particular justification - 3:21-5:21 1.         Justification: its provision ...Read More

I.          Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 II.         The Way of Salvation - 1:18-5:21 A.        Human Depravity: the doctrine of universal sin - 1:18-3:20 B.        Divine Deliverance: the doctrine of particular justification - 3:21-5:21 [It should be noted that I recognize a break in Paul’s argument betw...Read More

All people sustain a 3-fold relationship to sin. We are, first of all, under the penalty of sin. We are guilty of having transgressed the law of God and are thus liable to the punishment it imposes. But sin also exercises a power over every individual. We are born spiritually dead and morally corrupt, under the influence and mastery of sin, and thus subject to its power. Finally, there is the presence of sin within us. The principle of sin resides within our hearts and m...Read More

I.Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 II.The Way of Salvation - 1:18-5:21 III.The Way of Sanctification - 6:1-8:39 A.Freedom from Bondage to Sin - 6:1-23 B.Freedom from Bondage to the Law - 7:1-25 1.Sanctification and God's law - 7:1-13 a.the biblical response to legalism - vv. 1-6 1)the principle - v. 1 2)the picture - vv. 2-4 a)illustration - vv. 2-3 b)interpretation - v. 4 3)the practice - vv. 5-6 a)our past experience under the law - v. 5 b)our present expe...Read More

I.          Epistolary Introduction - 1:1-17 II.         The Way of Salvation - 1:18-5:21 III.       The Way of Sanctification - 6:1-8:39 A.        Freedom from Bondage to Sin - 6:1-23 B.        Freedom from Bondage to the Law - 7:1-25 C.        Free...Read More

[Before beginning your study of Romans 9, I suggest you read the material on the Purpose of Romans 9-11 found elsewhere in this series of studies.] IV.          God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 A.            Israel's Fall - 9:1-33   1.             Paul's pain - 9:1-5   a.   &nbs...Read More

I.              God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 A.            Israel's Fall - 9:1-33   1.             Paul's pain - 9:1-5 2.             God's purpose - 9:6-13   Virtually all misunderstandings of vv. 6-13 arise f...Read More

I.              God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 A.            Israel's Fall - 9:1-33   1.             Paul's pain - 9:1-5 2.             God's purpose - 9:6-13 3.         &nb...Read More

IV.          God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 A.            Israel's Fall - 9:1-33 B.            Israel's Fault - 10:1-21   1.             The negation of the gospel's purpose - 10:1-8   a.        &n...Read More

[I have written a more extensive analysis of the question of Israel’s future as a nation which may be found in two documentsunder the category of Controversial Issues elsewhere on the website.] IV. God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 A.        Israel's Fall - 9:1-33 B.        Israel's Fault - 10:1-21 C.        Israel's Future - 11:1-36 1.   ...Read More

IV.          God's Purpose with Israel - 9:1-11:36 V.            God's Principles for Living - 12:1-15:13   A.            The Christian and Life - 12:1-21 B.            The Christian and Law - 13:1-14 C.        &nbs...Read More

"Romans 9-11," writes Tom Wright, "is as full of problems as a hedgehog is full of prickles. Many have given it up as a bad job, leaving Romans as a book with eight chapters of gospel at the beginning, four of application at the end, and three of puzzle in the middle."   C. E. B. Cranfield has observed that "a superficial reading of the epistle might easily leave one with the impression that chapters 9 to 11 are simply an excursus which Paul has included under the...Read More

There is no shortage of commentaries on the book of Romans. Some of those available, however, are not worthy of note. Others prove to be either too technical or too devotional to suit the needs of the student. The following list contains those commentaries or specialized studies on Romans that I believe are worth owning. The most extensive bibliography on the book of Romans is found in the commentary by Fitzmyer, pp. 143-224 (see below). He lists more than 500 entri...Read More